Are wild Lions losing the fight against extinction?

Are wild Lions losing the fight against extinction?

Are wild Lions losing the fight?

Lions in South Africa are treated like livestock. They are classified as farm animals. Ca. 8.000 to 12.000 Lions live in captivity in most incredibly bad conditions. 

The Lion farmers have ONE GOAL, to make money out of their livestock. This circuit starts at the volunteer projects. Volunteers pay to be able to raise young cubs, that are taken away from their mother a few days after birth. When they are too old to be fed, the animals are exploited on Lion walks. Once they’ve grown up, the end as cannon fodder for hunts and bone sales. Sadly, lions are often traded between the breeding facilities, the volunteer projects as well as the Canned Hunting farms. 

They breed Lions to be sold as targets in Canned Hunts, where the animal is brought into a confined area, often just hours before the hunter arrives and often drugged, just to be shot by a wealthy person coming from Europe or America, recently also from Russia. 

Now the cruellest part of the Lion exploitation begins

The confined animals are easy targets for these safari loving hunting tourists. They have no chance to escape. 

R-Lee-Ermey with canned lion he shot - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

The hunters pay up to $5.000 for a female and up to $40.000 to shoot a male Lion. Export of trophy heads is booming. But only 10 % of the farmed Lions are destined to be hunted. And the greedy breeders have discovered a new market.

Lions head mounted to become a trophy - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

Lion bones are now sold to Asia. A whole lion carcass can bring up to $7.000. Nobody at the SA government cares, what bones are sent to Asia, and nobody checks if the skeletons are complete with a skull or not. So, bones from trophies and bones from bred Lions are mixed in bags and sent to Asia. 

Tiger Bone wine in Asia - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

Lion bones have replaced Tiger bones in Tiger Wine that is sold all over Asia. The South African Breeders claim, that they conserve the wild Lions, but all that happens is that the demand for the bones is steadily increasing. But why should the criminal syndicates that organize the bone trade buy expensive bones from breeders, while its cheap to poach wild Lions? 

Wild Lions are under enormous threat. The species has lost more than 90 % of its range in the last 100 Years. If we don’t act, the species will surely be wiped out in 2050. Please help us to avoid wild lions losing their fight against extinction!  Share and join our Facebook Group.  

Video: Courtesy of .Brut
Featured Image: Courtesy of The Guardian

NSPCA – URGENT LEGAL APPEAL FOR LIONS

NSPCA – URGENT LEGAL APPEAL FOR LIONS

APPEAL FOR LIONS – South Africa must end the breeding of big cats in captivity, Lion slaughterhouses and cruelty against our wildlife 

MEDIA STATEMENT by NSPCA

ISSUED ON 26 SEPTEMBER 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NSPCA LAUNCHES URGENT LEGAL APPEAL FOR LIONS

The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) has lodged an urgent interdict against the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) to suspend DEA’s authorisation of lion bone exports.

The NSPCA has long been actively involved in addressing the cruelty in the captive lion industry; starting with lion cubs for petting to ‘canned lion’ hunting or slaughter for lion bone, with pending cruelty cases.

The NSPCA has been frustrated in its efforts to prevent this cruelty by the lack of regulation within the industry. Not only are there regulatory loopholes, but there is also generally a lack of cooperation and communication from both national and provincial authorities.

Following decisions were taken at CITES CoP17, the Minister of Environmental Affairs established an export quota of 800 skeletons for 2017. The NSPCA requested a judicial review of the quota; with the review process still grinding through the Courts; the DEA announced a 1500 quota for 2018.

NSPCA - URGENT LEGAL APPEAL FOR LIONS

The NSPCA has launched an urgent interdict based on welfare concerns

The NSPCA believes, for both the review and interdict purposes that:

• there is inadequate regulation of lions’ conditions of captivity and slaughter;
• the study on which the decision was based is incomplete;
• the DEA failed to comply with its statutory duty to consult;
• based on expert opinion and data available, consider the decision to be scientifically irrational;
• lion bone trade may threaten the viability of lion and other big cat populations globally encouraging consumers to utilise lion bone as a replacement for tiger bone in wine, tonics and traditional medicines and may increase demand;
• captive lion ‘farming’ is an industry that has no conservation value. It poses a risk to both wild lion, tiger and other big cat populations globally;
• The lion bone trade has links to transnational wildlife crime syndicates and other wildlife crime.

The NSPCA would like to extend its heartfelt appreciation to the dedicated legal team and the various experts who have supported our efforts and cause.

The NSPCA is of the view that cruelty to lions is an inevitable consequence of the DEA’s misguided actions and is therefore committed to fighting this decision in court to protect lions.

— END —

 

 

The Ongoing Disgrace of South Africa’s Captive Lions

The Ongoing Disgrace of South Africa’s Captive Lions

The Ongoing Disgrace of South Africa’s Captive Lions

An estimated 7,000 to 14,000 (numbers vary) captive lions are held at over 300 Lion breeding facilities in South Africa. Increasingly, the animals are slaughtered for their bones and other body parts, many of which are sold in Asia for their purported — and scientifically discredited — health benefits.

Original article by

  1. The incident at the Lion Slaughterhouse in Bloemfontein, Free State

    Reinet Meyer is the senior inspector at the SPCA in the provincial city of Bloemfontein. She had received a tip. Two adult captive lions had been held 2 days without food or water in tiny transport crates on a farm called Wag ‘n Bietjie. She went to the farm, found the lions, and discovered that they’d been trucked about 250 miles. They came from Predators Pride, a “safari park” near Johannesburg. It keeps big cats in small enclosures so tourists can get close to them. For an extra fee, hold lion cubs or cuddle adult cheetahs while having their photos taken. 

    She then noticed a large pile of rotting, fly-covered meat outside a farm shed. Inside she found a supervisor. About eight workers stripped the skin and flesh from the fresh carcasses of 26 lions. “You could see that it wasn’t the first time they’d done this,” she says. That afternoon a truck arrived with 28 additional lions, which were to be killed the next day. Meyer insisted that the lions be released into a corral rather than be left in their transport crates overnight.

    She returned to Wag ‘n Bietjie the next morning to observe that animal welfare standards were being maintained. A veterinarian arrived at 9 a.m., drove into the newly arrived lions’ corral in a pickup truck, and darted all 28 with tranquillizers. As they lapsed into unconsciousness, he walked from one to the next. He methodically shot each in the ear with a .22-caliber rifle. “Overseas buyers don’t want a skull with a bullet in it,” he told Reinet. Which is why he didn’t shoot them directly in the cranium.

    Lion killed at Lion Slaughterhouse near Bloemfontein @ Conservationaction
    Jabula the Lion killed at Lion Slaughterhouse near Bloemfontein © Conservation Action
  2. Tiger Bone products made from Captive Lions

    These lion carcasses, as well as the ones Reinet had seen the previous day, were being processed into skeletons to be sold to wildlife product dealers in Asia. They would likely resell them as “tiger bone” to be made into a wide variety of products. Products like jewellery, “tiger-bone wine or -cake” and a dizzying array of “health tonics.” There is no mainstream scientific proof that tiger bone is of genuine medical use. On further investigation, Meyer counted 246 lions confined elsewhere on the farm, more than 100 of which were scheduled to be shot and reduced to bones.

    As grotesque as the scene at Wag ‘n Bietjie was, the farmer gave Meyer unfettered access to his property. Although he expressed some unease at killing the animals, he told Meyer that he was making good money. It was all legal; he had government permits to keep and kill lions.

    The low-tech lion slaughterhouse that Meyer had stumbled upon was part of South Africa’s large and increasingly controversial captive-bred lion industry. Not even Edna Molewa’s DEA knows how many lions this industry currently holds because it is poorly monitored. But, it’s one of the most lucrative of South Africa’s wildlife breeding sectors. It has generated generates tens of millions of dollars annually from a worldwide client base.

    Tiger Bone Wine Bottle somewhere in Asia
    Tiger Bone Wine Bottle somewhere in Asia
  3. Captive Lions History – Part I

    The industry originated in the late 1990s* to provide relatively cheap lions for foreign trophy hunters to shoot in fenced areas. (*More than 20 years ago, in 1997, the findings of  The Cook Report investigation were presented to the public by famous Roger Cook). Captive Lions (Males) were sold at between $25,000 and $40,000. Femelaes sold at half of it. But following U.S. restrictions on trophy imports from such “canned” hunts, the captive-bred lion industry is increasingly focused on supplying bones to Asia.

    Supporters of the industry, including especially the late Edna Molewa, the South African Environment Minister, promote captive lion breeding.  They define the slaughter as an example of “sustainable utilization of natural resources”. But increasingly vocal opponents, including prominent hunters, say that it is cruel, damaging to South Africa’s reputation. There is no benefit to wildlife conservation. Luke Hunter of the leading big cat conservation group Panthera says, that captive-bred lions have “unequivocally zero” conservation value.

    The debate about the industry is heating up — hunting groups have split over it. Lobbyists on both sides are ramping up their rhetoric. Now politicians are considering legislating against it. Because lions are a high-profile species and the captive-bred lion industry sells its products across the globe, South Africa’s decisions will have ripple effects through the international hunting and wildlife trades.

    Roger Cook who first uncovered the Canned Hunting Industry @ LionAid
    Roger Cook who first uncovered the Canned Hunting Industry © LionAid
  4. The circuit of abuse and exploitation

    Wild female lions only give birth every 18 months to two years, but in captivity, cubs can be are removed within days of being born.  This allows the females to produce up to four litters every two years. Lion breeders have learned to profit from every stage of a lion’s life.

    First – they extract by extracting cash and free labour from “voluntourists”.  These are often young foreigners in their school gap year and who pay well for the chance to hand-raise cubs while being told that “their” lions will later be released into the wild.

    Then – breeders charge tourists to hold cubs for photos, and when these cubs become adolescents, charge tourists again to go on “walking with lions” excursions.

    Then – adolescent lions become too large to be controlled — hand-raised lions have no fear of humans and can be extremely dangerous — they are sold to trophy hunting outfitters,

    Later – they are released into fenced areas and lion farms guarantee their clients easy, time-efficient kills, often without disclosing that the lions being shot are effectively tame.

    With its increasing size and high profile, the industry inevitably attracted scrutiny. In late 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service banned the import of captive-bred lion trophies, saying the industry had not proved that it benefited the long-term survival of lions in the wild. (Trophies from wild lion hunts could still be imported, however, because the agency found that trophy fees often went toward habitat conservation and anti-poaching patrols).

    Almost overnight, the industry lost more than half its hunting clients. Prices of Captive Lions plummeted. But the game wasn’t over for lion breeders.  They had an alternative market for their products — the bone trade — which they had quietly been developing since 2008.

    Canned Hunting Say No to Cub Petting
    Say No to petting of Captive Lions © Cannedlion.org
  5. Captive Lions History – Part II

    A trophy hunter normally takes just the skull and skin of the lion to a taxidermist to be mounted. The flesh and remainder of the skeleton remain with the outfitter or landowner. Prior to 2008, this was normally disposed of. In 2008, however, the first exports of lion bones — 35 skeletons — from South Africa to Southeast Asia took place. Arranged by powerful Asian syndicates that finance and commit wildlife crime in dozens of countries.

    The business grew rapidly. In 2009 and 2010, for example, 16 consignments totalling 320 lion skeletons were exported to Laos. Nine of these consignments were destined for Vixay Keosavang, a The circuit of abuse and exploitation who deals in a wide range of threatened species. (In 2013, the U.S. government The circuit of abuse and exploitation for information leading to the dismantling of his organization, the Xaysavang Network.) Early South African lion bone exporters included Marnus Steyl, a game rancher who has been implicated in The circuit of abuse and exploitation including The circuit of abuse and exploitation.

    By 2015, exports had risen to around 1,300 skeletons per year. Between 2008 and 2016, South Africa The circuit of abuse and exploitation with a total weight of more than 70 tons, almost all to Southeast Asian countries known as hubs of the illegal wildlife trade. That robust business continues today.

    Wildlife crime researchers say that Asian wildlife syndicates view lion bone as a convenient substitute for tiger bone.  There are well-established markets — albeit often black markets — across Asia. Tigers have long been listed on Appendix 1 of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) treaty. This mean means that virtually all international trade in their parts is banned.

    Captive Lions at a Breeding Farm @Big Cat Conservation
    Starving Lion at a Breeding Farm © Big Cat Conservation
  6.  How Lion Bones become Tiger Bones

    African lions have long been viewed as less threatened than tigers, and have been listed on Appendix 2. As a matter of facts, this allows international trade subject to permits. Lion bones leave South Africa legally, with CITES permits.  Once it arrives in Southeast Asia it is typically relabeled as tiger bone and smuggled to black markets. Thus, the legal product feeds illegal business. (Anti-hunting activist groups have recently identified numerous criminal participants in the South Africa-to-Southeast Asia lion bone trade.)

    In Vietnam, lion bones are likely made into “tiger-bone cake,” an expensive “traditional remedy,” with no proven medicinal properties. It is made by boiling bones along with turtle shell and other ingredients until they disintegrate. Then it is compacted into a chocolate bar-like “cake”. In China, the skeletons of big cats are often suspended in large vats of alcohol, which are tapped to produce “tiger-bone wine.”


    Read the full article  https://e360.yale.edu/features/the-ongoing-disgrace-of-south-africas-captive-bred-lion-trade

Help LYKA, the blind Lioness at Maasin Zoo

Help LYKA, the blind Lioness at Maasin Zoo

UPDATE about LYKA –  8.4.2019

Lyka the blind LionessA Rescue Team has been in the Philippines working on a mission to help Lyka. The six-year-old lioness lives with an undiagnosed eye condition at the Massin City Zoo. Lyka’s story has drawn international attention when visitors of the zoo have brought light to her cause.
A Team from the Lions Tigers & Bears Sanctuary was able to meet Lyka. The team wants to find out the truth behind her story. Lyka was born at the zoo, six years ago. After just six months, her litter mates all passed away and left Lyka as the sole survivor.

Does Lyka have a chance?

Veterinarian Dr Nielsen Donato and his team assessed Lyka over the course of the day. Lyka suffers from a metabolic bone disease. Due to this disease her foot did break after birth. As a result to poor breeding practices, Lyka has several malformations. Not to mention improper nutrition by previous zoo management. The team will be able to better diagnose Lyka’s eye condition during her physical examination.

The next steps will be to provide Lyka with a thorough physical examination under anaesthetic. This procedure will be the first veterinary examination ever for the lioness. The skilled veterinary team will be taking every precaution necessary. As with any procedure that involves sedation – it always comes with risks. There is no formal medical history to refer to. With Lyka’s apparent health issues, the team will utilize the safest means possible. But the medical exam is necessary, so she can properly be diagnosed and treated according to her conditions.

View the teams first report about Lyka

______________________________________________________________________

29.8.2018

Lyka the blind lioness living under terrible conditions in a tiny cage at PhilZoo
Lyka the blind lioness at the Philippine Maasin Zoo

LYKA, the blind lioness

has been written off as a ‘breeding mistake’ by the zoo, after going blind as a result of a congenital eye problem and now lives in a very small and barren enclosure in the zoo that is based in Iloilo, Southern Philippines. PhilZoos is an individual zoo facility, a government-run zoo in the Philippines. Without a doubt the rest of the zoo is in sub-standard condition as well.

PhilZoos is the Philippine Zoos & Aquariums Association – The National Zoo Association of the Philippines. But, Maasin zoo does not abide by PhilZoo’s ethical and welfare philosophy. However, colleagues in the Philippines and at PhilZoos are concerned for all animals in captivity. They have told us that: “While Maasin Zoo is not a member of Philippine Zoos & Aquarium Association, Philzoos, however, is looking into the matter already and is coordinating with Maasin Zoo and the concerned government agency on addressing the issues raised.”

Lyka the blind lioness living under terrible conditions in a tiny cage at PhilZoo
Lyka the blind lioness living under terrible conditions

Other animals near LYKA were also in very poor health and living in extremely unhealthy conditions. Maasin Zoo is government-funded but the staff has said that they don’t have enough money to improve the enclosures or properly care for the animals.

It’s unacceptable that Lyka and other animals at the Maasin Zoo continue to suffer from neglect in captivity while zoo officials and government do nothing.

Please sign the petition HERE to call on the Governor of Iloilo to immediately close the Maasin Zoo and free Lyka to a sanctuary. Please, we must save this beautiful Lioness. To see such a beautiful creature suffering like no one cares is extremely painful to see. Thank you sincerely!

https://www.thepetitionsite.com/246/850/602/lyka-the-blind-lioness-kept-in-a-rusty-cage/

Lion bones and predator farming – picking on the carcass of SA tourism

Lion bones and predator farming – picking on the carcass of SA tourism

By Ian Michler – 17 August 2018- Daily Maverick

Lion bones and predator farming – picking on the carcass of SA tourismPredator farming using lions and other species could cost South Africa over R54-billion over the next 10 years in loss of tourism brand attractiveness. This is according to a scientific report about to be released by the South African Institute of International Affairs. According to a scientific report about to be released by the South African Institute of International Affairs, the Economics of Captive Predator Breeding in South Africa, the burgeoning lion bone trade, canned lion hunting, cub petting and “voluntourism” are doing escalating damage to the image of South Africa as a tourism destination. There is already substantial body of evidence stacked against these notorious industries says the author, Ross Harvey, and it’s going to get worse.

Predator farming in South Africa, abusing volunteers
Predator farming in South Africa, abusing volunteers

The report comprises two sections. The first is a formal academic review of the scientific and “grey” literature, some of which is being used by those involved in attempts to justify their commercial predator activities. The second deals with the conservation and economic claims being made, including the most recent lion bone quota of 1,500 carcasses awarded by the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA). According to Harvey, “perhaps the most surprising finding was the sheer extent to which the skeleton quota numbers for the last two years (from 800 to 1,500) appear to have no grounding in science. Also startling is how little reliable economic analysis has been conducted on this industry”.

The cruelty and brutality of industrial-scale farming of lions in South Africa has been documented by Blood Lions and others, as has the killing of predators by hunters. In the past, these have been the ugly face of this industry. But Harvey’s report adds the burgeoning lion bone trade as well as the cub petting and “voluntourism” sectors which have over the last decade become just as insidious.

Some of the principle findings in the report are that:
Based on the current literature and data available, the conservation and economic claims of the entire industry “do not correspond to reality”. Excluding the canned hunting sector, the predator breeding industry and its other related activities may generate over R1-billion of revenue a year– less than 1% of the total tourism economy. The opportunity costs and negative externalities associated with these industries may “undermine South Africa’s brand attractiveness as a tourism destination by up to R54.51-billion over the next decade”.

Lion Male roaring
Lion Male roaring

The conservation claims have no validity. Current data is based on small sample sizes dependent on interview responses. If the industry is going to make any claims of economic benefit, further analysis and data collection is needed. The lion bone quota should be removed as there is insufficient scientific basis for awarding it. In addition, legal quotas create supply-side signals of legitimacy that promote parallel illegal markets as well as poaching for illegal stock to be laundered through “legal” markets. Volunteers on predator facilities are taking work away from local full-time job-seekers.

While the market for canned hunts has fallen, this has not resulted in any noticeable increase in demand for wild lion trophies. The price of lion bones is on the increase; heading over R50,000 for a carcass, and that this trade may well be replacing canned/captive hunting as the breeders primary revenue source. The connection between predator farming and organized crime has been well documented.

Caged Male Lions
Caged Male Lions

Of particular interest to the government, particularly the Department of Labour and the revenue authorities, will be Harvey’s findings on the much-touted job creation claims made by predator facilities and so-called sanctuaries. Rather than creating jobs, they make use of a seemingly endless stream of volunteers which is “crowding out” full-time jobs that would otherwise be available to local work-seekers. The volunteer exchange is the most incongruous of contracts as those offering their labor for free are also asked to pay substantial sums before setting foot in a facility. In essence, the volunteers pay twice; their cash in dollars or euros that provide substantial revenue streams for the operators, and then they work for free, without pay. It may seem inconceivable that anyone would offer both their cash and labor to scrub lion cages, mend fences and feed animals among many other chores. But as Harvey points out, this happens because of the misleading or false conservation claims used to lure them.

Lion Male waiting to be picked up for a canned hunt
Lion Male waiting to be picked up for a canned hunt

Unsuspecting volunteers from around the world are prepared to make these sacrifices thinking they are making a contribution to securing the future of wild lions. A further lure is the chance to cuddle and bottle-feed newly-born cubs ripped from their mothers.

The report highlights the economic contributions of these predator farming facilities as being relatively small. However, it is the first to quantify the significant potential losses to Brand South Africa. Concerns about the future of lion hunting and breeding are being noted at the highest level and next week Parliament will hold a two-day colloquium to hear a range of viewpoints. DM

The Lion Slaughterhouse in Free State

The Lion Slaughterhouse in Free State

The Lion Slaughterhouse in Free State

The lion breeding farm, the lion slaughterhouse discovered in Free State last week, belongs to a former SA Predator Association council member Andre Steyn. The gruesome discovery of at least 54 dead lions and a further 260 plus lions in captive conditions at Steyn’s farm, Wag n Bietjie, last week, sparked public rage over lions and tigers that are bred for the bullet and skinned for their bones for export to South East Asia’s widely unregulated medicine markets and wildlife body-parts trade.

A statement released by Blood Lions claims that there has been a mass lion shooting in the Free State Province, South Africa. The Blood Lions team and other environmentalists reacted with horror to reports that a lion slaughterhouse was established ‘overnight’ on a farm outside Bloemfontein. The team said in a statement that 19 lions were shot on this farm last week and 80 were allegedly on their way to the Free State or were already being held on the farm to be shot and their bones to be sent to the East. However, another source said 26 lions were shot on the farm on Tuesday and 28 more were shot on Wednesday. Allegedly the lions were anaesthetised before they got shot.

Captive Lioness waiting for her death
Captive Lioness waiting for her death

Their skeletons are then boiled until the meat falls off. After that, the bones are brought to a collecting point at a free-trade branch in the Free State where everything gets prepared for export. Traders in China and Vietnam pay for what is claimed to be as much as R100,000 for a lion skeleton exported from South Africa. Blood Lions referred to the decision of Environmental Minister Edna Molewa, who announced last year that 800 lion skeletons may be exported to the East every year.

Ian Michler, campaigner for lions and member of the Blood Lions team says that this trend should be very worrying for South Africans because the farmers of the country’s 8,000 captive lions will start shooting them all over the country. André Steyn’s farm, Wag-’n Bietjie, outside Bloemfontein is just the first of many to follow, says Michler. “The cruel reality is that South Africa’s iconic lions are traded on an industrial scale, to provide for China’s insatiable demand for their bones.” Lions in crates were brought to the farm from Gauteng, North West and other parts of the Free State. A source who works at a game farm in North West approached Blood Lions and asked for help after two lions were shot on the farm this week, were loaded on a truck and brought to the Free State. No permits were issued for the transport of the lions from North West to the Free State.

Lion skeletons missing their heads
Lion skeletons missing their heads

According to legislation, a veterinarian should have shot the lions but the driver of the truck shot them himself, he said. According to him (the source), he watched powerlessly how the lions were taken away. Steyn did not respond to inquiries. Complaints about alleged animal abuse on Wag-’n Bietjie have been received. A veterinarian, Dr. Hennie Klopper of Bloemfontein, confirmed he was involved in the anaesthesia of the lions at Wag-’n Bietjie. He said he had received permits to anaesthetise the lions. Reinet Meyer, a senior inspector of the Bloemfontein Animal Protection Association (DBV), confirmed to have been called to the farm on Tuesday.It was about two lions held in a very small crate for two or three days before being destroyed,” Meyer says the SPCA is investigating the incident. Adv. Antoinette Ferreira of the National Prosecuting Authority in Bloemfontein says she has no file/info at this stage and does not know whether criminal charges can be filed. She said the big question is if there were legal permits issued for this shooting. She said the National Department of Environmental Affairs issued permits according to a quota system.

The other question is if cruelty was committed to the animals when they were shot or before they were shot. The National Department of Environmental Affairs sent Beeld to the Free State Department of Economic Affairs, Small Business Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs. This department did not respond to inquiries at any time. According to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (Cites), export permits must also be obtained because lions are an endangered species.

Lion skinned for his skin and his bones
Lion killed for his skin and his bones

Link to the Blood Lions Facebook post

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day (12 August)

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day (12 August)

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day

Create Awareness! Today is solely dedicated to captive bred lion cubs of all ages. How we can improve their survival and improve their animal rights. South African lion sanctuary boss says every other breeding facility in nation linked to “canned hunting”. Paul Hart (Drakenstein Lion Sanctuary) said those who claim they are seeking to conserve the species are directly or indirectly providing animals to be slaughtered by wildlife trophy hunters. The Drakenstein Lion Park, which bills itself as the “only genuine lion sanctuary in the Western Cape”, rescues captive animals destined for canned hunts. Hart said: “There are thousands of volunteers getting conned”.

Cash Before Conservation – Born Free Report 2018

Cash Before Conservation – Born Free Report 2018

Cash Before Conservation – Born Free Report 2018

An Overview of the Breeding of Lions for Hunting and Bone Trade

The rapid expansion of commercial lion breeding and canned hunting industries, particularly in South Africa, is a cause for real concern.
From small beginnings a decade or so ago, there may now be as many as 8,000 lions and other predators spread across more than 200 captive breeding facilities, many languishing in poor conditions. These animals are unashamedly exploited for profit by their captors at every stage of their often short lives.
Cubs are removed within a few days of birth in order to bring their mothers back into breeding condition quickly, and to provide unwitting tourists with cute photo props and misguided volunteers with cubs to hand-rear in the mistaken belief that they are genuine orphans and that, one day, they are destined to be returned to the wild. As the animals grow, they are used for other tourist activities such as ‘walking with lions’.
The ultimate fate for many of these unfortunate animals is to be shot in a ‘canned hunt’ by a paying ‘hunter’, usually from overseas, to be killed so their body parts can be exported to Asian markets, or to be cycled back into the
breeding machine.

Cash before Conservation
Cash before Conservation

 

Downlaod the article HERE

 

Born-Free-Lion-Breeding-Report

 

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018
Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding - 21. and 22. August 2018
DEA is sabotaging the Department of Tourism – Image @ Mwana

This letter was sent to Minister Edna Molewa by CACH UK upfront to the planned colloquium in August 2018

“How the DEA is sabotaging the SA Department of Tourism:

Everyone knows that lion breeding and canned lion hunting in South Africa has attracted significant international criticism and that this has increasingly damaged South Africa’s image abroad. Yet your Department spends millions every year trying to promote tourism here.

What you, and in particular your colleagues in other departments, may be less well aware of is the sheer scale of the overseas reaction. When you see the extent of the damage to SA brand image, you will be shocked.

To demonstrate this, retired lawyer David Nash of Campaign Against Canned Hunting ( CACH) UK has prepared the attached review. It lists the huge range of import bans, airline trophy bans, negative press coverage, anti-canned hunting campaigns, protest marches, tourist industry views and social media criticism. Once you read this important research, you will clearly see how Min Edna Molewa’s DEA is undermining your efforts.

Further, the damage to Brand SA adversely impacts Responsible Tourism – the fastest growing sector of the global tourism industry.

Hunting PR, swallowed by the DEA and other SA conservation structures, claims that canned hunting is essential to the South African economy.

CACH strongly disagrees: rather than benefiting the South African economy, captive lion breeding and canned hunting is a wasteful use of land and significantly limits employment and up-skilling opportunities when compared with other forms of farming and ethical wildlife tourism.
This Review demonstrates a clear economic case for banning lion farming (through a managed phasing out) and canned lion hunting.”

You can view and download the 50-page report HERE.

South Africa’s unregulated captive lion breeding industry will shortly be reviewed by the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs in a two day hearing open to the public.

According to the Committee chairperson, Mohlopi Mapulane, the aim of the event is to facilitate a constructive debate around the future of captive lion breeding and hunting in SA. A colloquium titled ‘Captive Lion Breeding for Hunting in South Africa: Harming or Promoting the Conservation Image of the Country’ will take place on 21 and 22 August, giving stakeholders from across the board an opportunity to present arguments for and against captive breeding of lions.

There is an outcry, and we must find a way to address it as soon as possible,” Mapulane says. “What is worrying is how this issue is affecting SA’s standing internationally. We cannot allow [captive lion breeding] to blemish our internationally-acclaimed wildlife and conservation record.

A report published by UK-based Born Free Foundation in March backs up Mapulane’s fears over SA’s waning reputation as an international wildlife and conservation pioneer, illustrating how the captive breeding of lions for hunting and their bones has detracted from SA’s conservation status.

Mapulane says the committee will “put a spotlight on the [captive breeding] practice, to better understand the different views that exist.” Following the discussions, the committee will decide whether to review and/or amend legislation, or whether they would have to initiate new legislation through parliament.

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

CACH Brand SA Review August 2018