Captive Lions Awareness Day 

Captive Lions Awareness Day 

District 410A – Captive Lions Awareness Day

Join us on our Captive Lions Awareness Day on Saturday, 8 December 2018, at the Brackenfell PicknPay from 11:00 to 13:00. More than 10 000 Lions are held in captivity in South Africa. At the same time, less than 20 000 Lions still exist in the wild in the whole of Africa. South Africa, one of only 7 hotspots with more than 1000 Lions, counts less than 2 000. As members of Lions Clubs International, we have the responsibility to save our iconic Lion species. District 410A is looking to raise R1000 per Lion on behalf of the Project Lions4Lions

The Brackenfell Lions & Leo’s will be taking and jailing the District 410 A Governor on the 8th of December at Pick n Pay Hyper Brackenfell at 11 am. They will only release him on a minimum bail of R10 000.


Raising the awareness of the plight of our Lions in Africa

In 2018, more than ever captive bred Lions are currently living behind bars in South Africa in estimated 300 facilities. Raised in captivity at hidden breeding farms or at public scamtuaries, some of these animals are petted as cubs by tourists, who feed and care for the young lions or even walk with them. Once the animals are too old for petting/walking, they are sold to canned hunting outfitters. While Canned Hunting becomes less attractive, breeders simply slaughter their Lions for their bones to be sold to Asia. 


Our Lions are in need and we need to do our best to save our iconic symbol

Since the Lion bone trade isn’t a “sideline” of the canned hunting industry any more, low-cost mass Lion slaughterhouses have been erected in Free State and probably other provinces as well. The presence of a legal trade clearly results in more and more poaching of wild lions as well as in poaching of lions that live at the very few real sanctuaries in South Africa.

You can SMS your name/club with your pledge amount to 084 788 6523. Bank details will be forwarded to you for your deposits.

Keep your eyes open for our upcoming posts on our Facebook Pages:

Lions4Lions Facebook Group
Lions4Lions awareness video
District 410 A Facebook Page
District 410A Leo Facebook Page

#Freethelions #Lions4Lions #District410Arocks #WeServe #CaptiveLionsAwarenessDay

Captive Lions Awareness Day
Captive Lions Awareness Day
 

Are wild Lions losing the fight against extinction?

Are wild Lions losing the fight against extinction?

Are wild Lions losing the fight?

Lions in South Africa are treated like livestock. They are classified as farm animals. Ca. 8.000 to 12.000 Lions live in captivity in most incredibly bad conditions. 

The Lion farmers have ONE GOAL, to make money out of their livestock. This circuit starts at the volunteer projects. Volunteers pay to be able to raise young cubs, that are taken away from their mother a few days after birth. When they are too old to be fed, the animals are exploited on Lion walks. Once they’ve grown up, the end as cannon fodder for hunts and bone sales. Sadly, lions are often traded between the breeding facilities, the volunteer projects as well as the Canned Hunting farms. 

They breed Lions to be sold as targets in Canned Hunts, where the animal is brought into a confined area, often just hours before the hunter arrives and often drugged, just to be shot by a wealthy person coming from Europe or America, recently also from Russia. 

Now the cruellest part of the Lion exploitation begins

The confined animals are easy targets for these safari loving hunting tourists. They have no chance to escape. 

R-Lee-Ermey with canned lion he shot - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

The hunters pay up to $5.000 for a female and up to $40.000 to shoot a male Lion. Export of trophy heads is booming. But only 10 % of the farmed Lions are destined to be hunted. And the greedy breeders have discovered a new market.

Lions head mounted to become a trophy - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

Lion bones are now sold to Asia. A whole lion carcass can bring up to $7.000. Nobody at the SA government cares, what bones are sent to Asia, and nobody checks if the skeletons are complete with a skull or not. So, bones from trophies and bones from bred Lions are mixed in bags and sent to Asia. 

Tiger Bone wine in Asia - are wild lions losing the fight against extinction?

Lion bones have replaced Tiger bones in Tiger Wine that is sold all over Asia. The South African Breeders claim, that they conserve the wild Lions, but all that happens is that the demand for the bones is steadily increasing. But why should the criminal syndicates that organize the bone trade buy expensive bones from breeders, while its cheap to poach wild Lions? 

Wild Lions are under enormous threat. The species has lost more than 90 % of its range in the last 100 Years. If we don’t act, the species will surely be wiped out in 2050. Please help us to avoid wild lions losing their fight against extinction!  Share and join our Facebook Group.  

Video: Courtesy of .Brut
Featured Image: Courtesy of The Guardian

How the captive Lion bone trade is killing Africas and Asias big cats

How the captive Lion bone trade is killing Africas and Asias big cats

Original Article August 2, 2018 – by John R. Platt – Article adapted for better readability
Angry headlines around the world decried the news that the Trump administration had issued trophy-import permits for 38 lions killed by 33 hunters — including many high-rolling Republican donors — between 2016 and 2018. But the captive Lion bone trade is much worse. Experts worry this booming trade could doom the big cats in the wild.

How the captive Lion bone trade is killing Africas and Asias big cats

The Lion species has experienced massive population drops over the past two decades. In 2016, the big cats got some protection under the Endangered Species Act. The Obama-era regulations still allowed some hunting. Imports of trophies were legal, as long as the host countries could prove that their hunts were sustainable. The Trump administration lifted that requirement last year and instead allowed imports on a “case-by-case basis.” Those 38 dead lions represent the Trump administration’s shift on hunting of endangered species.

A story that came out about the captive Lion bone trade around the same time was more worrying than these trophies. A leaked letter from the South Africa Department of Environmental Affairs revealed that it had nearly doubled the legal captive lion bone trade quota and it would allow the skeletons to be exported from the country. The quota went up from 800 to 1500 skeletons, a dramatic increase.

Avaaz Poster in Mall against Captive Lion Bone Trade

The captive Lion bone trade is worse

Unlike the lions that are slain by hunters, the South African bones come from the country’s 300-plus lion farms. Here, the big cats are raised — often in terrible conditions — for use in “caged hunts.” There, according to the 2015 documentary Blood Lions, foreign hunters pay as much as $50,000 to shoot semi-tame lions in small, walled-off, inescapable encampments. The heads and skins from these caged hunts become trophies. The rest of the bodies are shipped to Asia. There the bones are ground down to be used as “medicine” and as a component in wine. There is no medicinal quality in lion or tiger bones.

These factory farms are believed to contain about 8,000 to 12,000 captive-bred lions. An astonishing number compared to the fewer than 20,000 lions estimated to still live in the wild throughout Africa. South Africa itself is estimated to hold fewer than 2,000 adult wild lions.

Where does this demand for lion products come from? Experts say the increase in the lion-bone trade is a response to the decline in wild tiger populations in Asia. Tigers are also poached for “medicinal” products, although those big cats have become so rare in the wild — an estimated 3,900 animals spread across a dozen countries — that the industry has been forced to turn to other felines to feed its fortunes.

The captive Lion bone trade now feeds the Tiger Wine industry

Captive Lion bone trade is on the rise, whily hunting for trophies declines

Luke Hunter of Panthera says, “the lion never had any traditional value in China. It’s an analog to the tiger, so it seems to be acceptable there”. As more lions enter the legal bone trade, the danger to wild lions increases. A July 2017 report from the Environmental Investigation Agency said that legal trade in lion bones further threatens wild tigers and lions by stimulating demand for products made from their bodies. In traditional Asian medicine, wild products are considered more potent and valuable than farm-raised equivalents.

Interestingly enough, the farms and lion bone trade appears to also be inspiring an increase in the poaching of captive lions. Last month a report found that at least 60 captive lions in South Africa were killed by poachers since 2016.

Lion bred for the capitive lion bone trade

At least five captive tigers were also killed in South Africa

It is unclear how many tigers exist in South Africa, but the country has exported more than 200 captive-bred tigers over the past five years. About half of those cats were exported to Vietnam and Thailand, hubs of tiger-product smuggling activity.

All of this is big business and while most of it is legal, some of it may not be. Another new report, issued by two South African organizations called the EMS Foundation and Ban Animal Trading, accused the legal lion-bone trade of shipping a much greater quantity of bones than officially reported. The two organizations used their report to call for eliminating all lion exports from South Africa. They aslo call for restricting the breeding of lions and other big cats, and investigating the finances of breeders.

What does the future hold for wild lions? A 2015 study predicted that wild lions would see another 50 percent population decline in two decades. Reasons are poaching, the bushmeat trade, retaliatory killings for predation of livestock, and habitat loss. Add legal trophy hunting and poaching inspired by the legal bone trade into the mix and that timeline may become accelerated — and lions throughout Africa could pay the price.

Original Article August 2, 2018 – by John R. Platt

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day (12 August)

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day (12 August)

International Lion Breeding Awareness Day

Create Awareness! Today is solely dedicated to captive bred lion cubs of all ages. How we can improve their survival and improve their animal rights. South African lion sanctuary boss says every other breeding facility in nation linked to “canned hunting”. Paul Hart (Drakenstein Lion Sanctuary) said those who claim they are seeking to conserve the species are directly or indirectly providing animals to be slaughtered by wildlife trophy hunters. The Drakenstein Lion Park, which bills itself as the “only genuine lion sanctuary in the Western Cape”, rescues captive animals destined for canned hunts. Hart said: “There are thousands of volunteers getting conned”.

THE EXTINCTION BUSINESS – Report by EMS Foundation and Ban Animal Trading – 2018

THE EXTINCTION BUSINESS – Report by EMS Foundation and Ban Animal Trading – 2018

For more than a decade, South Africa has been actively supporting and growing the international trade in big cat bones, despite local and international outrage and condemnation from conservation and protection organisations, lion scientists, and experts.
In 2017, South Africa’s Minister of Environmental Affairs, Edna Molewa, controversially, and in the face of vociferous opposition and robust arguments against this trade, set the annual export quota at 800 lion skeletons. Even more alarmingly, Molewa, without stakeholder participation, took the incomprehensible decision to almost double the quota in 2018 to 1,500 skeletons.

Download the article here

THE-EXTINCTION-BUSINESS-South-Africas-lion-bone-trade