24 Lions relocated to Mocambique – Update May 2019

24 Lions relocated to Mocambique – Update May 2019

24 Lions relocated to Mocambique – UPDATE May 2019 –

24 Lions relocated to Mocambique in 2018 to a 2.5 million-acre habitat in the Zambeze Delta area. After years of civil war in Mozambique, Lions were all but lost in the Zambezi Delta region. The introduction of  Lions from South Africa in 2018 will grow the population to as many as 500 within 15 years. It was the largest move of Lions across an international boundary in history. The environment was once decimated by civil war and poaching in Mocambique. It has only benefited as a result of a 24-year effort led by Zambeze Delta Safaris. However, in spite of these efforts, the lion population has struggled to recover. Lions have are extinct in 26 African countries. Twenty Four Lions is determined to make sure that Mozambique doesn’t join that list.

24 lions relocated to Mocambique © 24 Lions

There was very little wildlife in the Coutada 11 concession, in central Mozambique, when Mark Haldane, a South African hunter and one of the architects of the lion reintroduction, first arrived in 1995. In a spontaneous decision, Haldane bought the lease from a German owner who wanted nothing more to do with war-torn Mozambique. At the time, there were fewer than 44 sable antelope and perhaps a thousand buffalo on one million acres. The forests were full of snares and traps for small game species, and signs of civil war were everywhere.

Operating a single hunting lodge, Haldane dedicated much of his time and resources to helping the wildlife return by investing in anti-poaching measures, such as motorbike patrols and a team of scouts. There are over 3,000 sable antelope on the concession today and the block holds some 25,000 buffalo.

24 lions relocated to Mocambique © 24 Lions

6 cubs have already been born

Haldane and his partners on the project spend a lot of time with the community living in the concession. Haldane employs some villagers at his camp, but most rely on subsistence farming.

In order to keep the genetic mix as wide as possible, the team sourced the Lions from various reserves in South Africa and kept them all in a boma in KwaZulu Natal’s Mkhuze Game Reserve for three weeks to complete medical tests. In two private planes for the journey to Mozambique in May 2018 the 24 Lions did fly to Mocambique. 

Already, six cubs were born since the Lions’ release. Many don’t like the idea that Zambeze Conservation and Anti Poaching, a hunting orientated venture, is the head behind the relocation. But not all hunting outfitters are doing bad things. The past has shown that when Lions return to a previously wildlife-emptied area, all other wildlife will sooner or later come back. These particular Lions will never be hunted.

We are sure, Coutada 11 will be a stronghold for the wild African Lion in the future.

Read the full National Geographic article

How the world’s largest lion relocation, from South Africa to Zimbabwe, was pulled off

 
24 Lions relocated to Mocambique © 24 Lions

 

First article about the Twenty Four Lions relocation

Previous article about the reintroduction of 24 Lions to Mocambique

24 Lions24 Lions Facebook Page   Zambeze Conservation and Anti Poaching

UPDATE – 24 Lions – a future for Lions in Mocambique

UPDATE – 24 Lions – a future for Lions in Mocambique

😈👿👿 Update about the project – one lion lost to a poacher

Twenty Four Lions bring hope to Mocambique!

Hope for Twenty Four Lions in Mocambique
Hope for 24 Lions in Mocambique

Twenty Four Lions were reintroduced to a 2.5 million-acre habitat in the Zambeze Delta of Mozambique on August 5, in the largest move of lions across an international boundary in history. Today, fewer than 20,000 Lions run wild. Twenty Four Lions will be the seed population that will reverse this trend in the Zambeze Delta, an ecosystem of over 2 million acres. The environment, once decimated by civil war and poaching, has benefited as a result of a 24-year effort led by Zambeze Delta Safaris and dedicated to sound conservation practices. However, in spite of these efforts, the lion population has struggled to recover. Lions have become extinct in 26 African countries. Twenty Four Lions is determined to make sure that Mozambique doesn’t join that list.

24 Lions were relocated to a private reserve in Mocambique. They will be closely monitored for a minimum of 6 years
24 Lions were relocated to a private reserve in Mocambique. They will be closely monitored for a minimum of 6 years

The Cabela Family Foundation, in partnership with the Ivan Carter Wildlife Conservation Alliance, Zambeze Delta Safaris and Marromeu Safaris is proud to support this initiative. Without the revenue from hunting and the decades of conservation work from Zambeze Delta Safaris and Marromeu Safaris, none of this would have been possible.

The most important aspect of any conservation initiative is the scientific foundation upon which it is built. Learn more about the research behind Twenty Four Lions and what we hope to learn from this project.

 

ENJOY the lovely video about the 24 Lions Project

 

 


Update about the 24 Lions at the 8. September 2018

Lion paw destroyed in a gin trap, lion euthanizedSadly lion 2783 has been lost due to a very cruel act by a poacher.
The harsh reality of gin traps – the poacher knew he had a lion in his trap! He had contacted interested buyers to sell off the lion parts. He had informed them he would only kill the lion once he had been paid and the lion had weakened! As a result, the Lion had to be euthanized.
Lions 2783 along with his brother started walking their new territory. They headed inland from the delta. Tragically he was caught on the front paw by a poacher’s Gin trap. The anti-poaching unit picked this up on their morning flight to monitor all the lions. They mobilized their team and darted him.

A vet was on hand but unfortunately, the damage was too bad, every bone in his foot had been crushed. Finally the young male was euthanized. 

Lion paw destroyed in a gin trap Lion euthanisedThe poacher who set the trap has been arrested and is now with the Marromeu police. His brother (lion 2784) is still walking but seems to be heading back to the security of the floodplain as a result of his loss. The balance of the lions are on the floodplain and are really doing well. They are monitored on a daily basis. Anti-poaching is on high alert and continue to do everything in their power to keep the area clean.

Follow this link to learn more and to donate for antipoaching measures …

 

24 Lions24 Lions Facebook Page   Zambeze Conservation and Anti Poaching

Skye the Lion – Call to Action

Skye the Lion – Call to Action
Opinion post: Written by Simon Espley, CEO of Africa Geographic
Skye the lion by Charlie Lynam
Skye the lion by Charlie Lynam

Skye the lion call to action

The highly controversial shooting of Skye the Lion by a trophy hunter in the Umbabat section of the Greater Kruger could conceivably mark the beginning of the end for trophy hunting in this part of Africa. I am speculating here, but please hear me out…

Since we reported the known facts about the hunt, I and many others have been digging for clarity. Was the hunted lion indeed ‘Skye’? – a dominant male of the Western Pride, featured in this tribute ‘The Story of Skye’ by Charlie Lynam, a shareholder in Ingwelala, one of the properties making up Umbabat. The photos accompanying this opinion editorial are of Skye and his pride.

The trophy hunting team insist that the lion killed was not Skye the pride male, claiming that he was in fact an old male lion with worn teeth and a protruding spine. But they refuse point blank to supply a photo of the dead lion to prove their claim, citing legal and personal safety concerns. Lynam and others insist that Skye the pride male was killed. According to Lynam, Skye has not been seen since the day of the killing of that lion. Additionally, one of his cubs has since been killed and some of the pride lionesses have been beaten up as a new coalition of males has moved into the area. This is classic lion behavior when a dominant male is removed and new male/s move into the vacuum – cubs are killed (infanticide) and lionesses are beaten up as they try to defend their cubs.

The Lion Skye with two cubs
The Lion Skye with two cubs @ Charlie Lynam

Recently activist Don Pinnock, who broke the story, has revealed that the hunter in question is an American by the name of Jared Whitworth, from Hardinsburg, Kentucky. He also revealed the names of the South African hunting outfitter who sold and managed the hunt and the government official who signed off on the lion permit. Whitworth is a member of Safari Club International (SCI), which defines hunting success in terms of size and rarity. Apparently the larger the horns/tusks and rarer the animal, the more respect you are due for killing it. Whitworth’s 15-year-old daughter was awarded the title “2018 SCI Young Hunter of the Year”, and the SCI website features her proudly posing with a massive buffalo she killed. I found this out by visiting the SCI website a few days ago – and note with interest that today those pages have been removed (fortunately I saved a screenshot). Are the SCI members now afraid of the tree-huggers? Perhaps they should be …

And here, ladies and gentlemen, is where I start reasoning why I believe that trophy hunting will soon end in the Greater Kruger.

As I write this, an investigative agency has been hired to look into the legality of the Skye hunt, there is a popular online petition calling for justice, and various people are digging away to find out the personal information of everyone involved. Momentum is building, and I hear that the guilty parties are shaking in their boots. Anyone remember what happened to Walter Palmer, the American dentist who shot Cecil the Lion, once his name was known to the public?

Let me be blunt: Do trophy hunters really think that they can keep these things secret in this day and age, and do they and their families feel safe knowing that their deeds will be in the public domain sooner or later? I understand from sources that the southern African trophy hunting industry is already suffering from cancellations because of increased public scrutiny and vigilantism.

Skye the Lion watching over his territory at Kruger Park
Skye the Lion watching over his territory

Beyond the hunter and the hunting outfitter, what about the other people involved – the government officials and game reserve management? How long before these people decide that they are not prepared to take the risk and stress of being associated with this industry that specializes in surgically removing the last-remaining big-gene animals? Many of these people are simply ordinary employees, who signed up to be involved in conservation and now find themselves defending an industry they don’t even believe in, and being subjected to personal abuse and threats of physical violence.

We are increasingly seeing government departments and officials being targeted by a tidal wave of emotional backlash against trophy hunting. The fact that much of the commentary is factually inaccurate is beside the point – this is a battle of emotion, not fact. The anger generated amongst the social media-empowered general public, driven by activists who value impact over fact, is a toxic cocktail that will drive change – regardless of the consequences. Recently the Namibian government issued a ruling that trophy hunters to that country cannot publish kill photos on social media. This bizarre and unenforceable move is surely a testament to the extent of the pressure that is being brought to bear on the trophy hunting industry.

Anti-hunting activists are evolving, and increasingly now combining their immense social media support base with targeted action against specific perpetrators. On the other hand, the trophy hunting industry does not have the DNA to evolve. They are still barking out the same defensive rhetoric from decades ago – despite the conservation landscape having shifted massively under the immense pressure of habitat loss and poaching. This industry will never be driven by ethics and transparency; it is entirely opportunistic and known to retrofit the conservation argument based on the specifics of the particular animal hunted.

In the court of public opinion, we are all judged by the company we keep, and the partners we choose. In my opinion, if management of the Greater Kruger does not change tack and distance itself from their trophy hunting partners, this tremendous conservation initiative will self-destruct. Members of the Greater Kruger simply cannot any longer risk being associated with an industry that refuses to evolve, and regularly shoots itself in the foot. Quite simply, they have to dissociate themselves or face eventual ruin.

Skye the Lion shot at Umbabat by an American hunter after been lured out of Kruger Park
Skye the Lion shot at Umbabat

And that is why I believe that it is only a matter of time before trophy hunting ceases to be a management tool in the Greater Kruger.

Of course, the landowners and managers of these wildlife reserves will consequently need to source alternative funding for their rapidly escalating anti-poaching and general conservation costs. Photographic tourism can provide some of the extra funding, but not all of it. Even if all parties agree to higher lodge and vehicle densities (with concomitant increased environmental pressure) and higher lodge prices, not all areas in the Greater Kruger have the same tourism potential – this is a simple fact based on location, carrying capacity and biodiversity. Many of the most vocal social media activists have never been on safari in Africa, and are unlikely ever to. But hopefully, they will donate to a fund to enable anti-poaching work in the Greater Kruger to continue.

I suspect that some landowners, especially the local communities, will seriously consider alternative land uses such as livestock and crops, once trophy hunting is off the table. There are few straight roads in Africa.

Some pro-hunting folk will refuse to acknowledge advice like mine if it does not come accompanied by instant iron-clad alternatives to hunting. With respect, this is like refusing to accept that your daughter is pregnant, just because she won’t tell you who the father is. The first step to solving a problem is to acknowledge that you have a problem.

I have great faith that in time trophy hunting in the Greater Kruger will be replaced by a more ethical, more relevant sustainable land-use strategy. This will take time, but it will happen. A luta continua!

CALL TO ACTION:
Please have your say on the lion bone quota and the killing of Skye the lion in South Africa and submit your comment to the Chairperson of the Colloquium in Parliament, Cape Town. The debate will focus precisely on these two controversial topics and we ask you to support our participation!

The Colloquium will start on Tuesday, August the 21st 2018 at 8.00 so, please, send your message before Monday.

Please write to
pmapulane@parliament.gov.za, the Chair, and briefly/clearly state:

  • Demand justice for Skye the lion and his pride, after he was baited out of the Kruger and shot in June in a private reserve.
  • If you approve or not the captive lion industry and the lion bone trading in South Africa
  • If you agree or not on the practice of hunting around the unfenced boundary of the Kruger Park.
  • Indicate which country are you from and if you will continue to visit South Africa and its Parks after realizing how this country exploits its iconic animals and natural resources.

If you want, you can also:

  • Suggest that the truth over the illegal trading in lion bones due to corruption is emerging and creating outrage worldwide.
  • Comment if trophy hunting is/ is not, in your opinion, essential for the conservation of eco-systems and wildlife in South Africa

 

Cash Before Conservation – Carte Blanche Video

Cash Before Conservation – Carte Blanche Video

WATCH: “Why does the Department of Environmental Affairs, in the light of overwhelming opposition, still persist in allowing the breeding of captive breeding of lions and lion bone exports?”

Did you miss the revealing Carte Blanche video on the 10. April 2018? Find out WHERE all those cute cubs are going after you pet them.