Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding - 21. and 22. August 2018
DEA is sabotaging the Department of Tourism – Image @ Mwana

This letter was sent to Minister Edna Molewa by CACH UK upfront to the planned colloquium in August 2018

“How the DEA is sabotaging the SA Department of Tourism:

Everyone knows that lion breeding and canned lion hunting in South Africa has attracted significant international criticism and that this has increasingly damaged South Africa’s image abroad. Yet your Department spends millions every year trying to promote tourism here.

What you, and in particular your colleagues in other departments, may be less well aware of is the sheer scale of the overseas reaction. When you see the extent of the damage to SA brand image, you will be shocked.

To demonstrate this, retired lawyer David Nash of Campaign Against Canned Hunting ( CACH) UK has prepared the attached review. It lists the huge range of import bans, airline trophy bans, negative press coverage, anti-canned hunting campaigns, protest marches, tourist industry views and social media criticism. Once you read this important research, you will clearly see how Min Edna Molewa’s DEA is undermining your efforts.

Further, the damage to Brand SA adversely impacts Responsible Tourism – the fastest growing sector of the global tourism industry.

Hunting PR, swallowed by the DEA and other SA conservation structures, claims that canned hunting is essential to the South African economy.

CACH strongly disagrees: rather than benefiting the South African economy, captive lion breeding and canned hunting is a wasteful use of land and significantly limits employment and up-skilling opportunities when compared with other forms of farming and ethical wildlife tourism.
This Review demonstrates a clear economic case for banning lion farming (through a managed phasing out) and canned lion hunting.”

You can view and download the 50-page report HERE.

South Africa’s unregulated captive lion breeding industry will shortly be reviewed by the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs in a two day hearing open to the public.

According to the Committee chairperson, Mohlopi Mapulane, the aim of the event is to facilitate a constructive debate around the future of captive lion breeding and hunting in SA. A colloquium titled ‘Captive Lion Breeding for Hunting in South Africa: Harming or Promoting the Conservation Image of the Country’ will take place on 21 and 22 August, giving stakeholders from across the board an opportunity to present arguments for and against captive breeding of lions.

There is an outcry, and we must find a way to address it as soon as possible,” Mapulane says. “What is worrying is how this issue is affecting SA’s standing internationally. We cannot allow [captive lion breeding] to blemish our internationally-acclaimed wildlife and conservation record.

A report published by UK-based Born Free Foundation in March backs up Mapulane’s fears over SA’s waning reputation as an international wildlife and conservation pioneer, illustrating how the captive breeding of lions for hunting and their bones has detracted from SA’s conservation status.

Mapulane says the committee will “put a spotlight on the [captive breeding] practice, to better understand the different views that exist.” Following the discussions, the committee will decide whether to review and/or amend legislation, or whether they would have to initiate new legislation through parliament.

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

Colloquium on Captive Lion Breeding – 21. and 22. August 2018

CACH Brand SA Review August 2018